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Cash-Only Physician Practices Could Save You A Bundle

When most people think of “cash-only” medical practices, plastic surgery and dermatology procedures are top of mind. But there is a small contingent of primary care physicians who offer low-cost “pay-as-you-go” services. Yearly physicals, well-child visits, screening tests, vaccinations, and chronic disease management are all part of comprehensive primary care options available. And this costs the average patient only $300 a year.

It is estimated that 75% of Americans require an average of 3.5 office visits per year to receive all the medical care they need. If the average office visit is 15-20 minutes in length, then that averages out to 1 hour of a physician’s time each year. How much should that cost? Dr. Alan Dappen (founder of Doctokr Family Medicine, a cash-only primary care practice in Vienna, Virginia) says, “$300.” But insurance premiums are often closer to $300 per month for these Americans, and that doesn’t include co-pays for provider visits.

So why aren’t people buying high deductible insurance plans, saving thousands on premiums per year, and flocking to cash-only primary care practices?  Dr. Dappen says it’s a simple matter of mindset – “People have been conditioned to believe that if they pay their insurance premiums, then healthcare is ‘free.’ In reality, their employers are taking out $3600 or more per year from their paychecks for this ‘free’ care. But since employees don’t see that money, they don’t miss it as much.”

A high deductible health insurance plan (where insurance doesn’t kick in until you’ve paid at least $3000 out of pocket in a given year) costs about $110/month for the generally healthy 75% of Americans (you can check rates at eHealthInsurance.com). That’s a savings of at least $2280/year for those who switch from a regular deductible plan to a high deductible plan.

What are the odds that the average, reasonably healthy American will outspend $2280/year? I asked Alan Dappen how many of his 1500 patients spent more than $2000 on his services per year. The answer? Three.

“Most Americans who buy-in to low deductible plans pay a lot more in premiums than they’ll ever use. They’re essentially betting against the casino, and we all know who wins on those bets.”

So I asked Alan Dappen if “the casino” was making most of its money on the “healthy” 75% of its enrollees to subsidize the cost of the sick 25%.

“Sure they are. And I suppose if enough people saw the light and switched to high deductible plans with cash-only physicians, it might force change in the health insurance industry.  Perhaps the government would use our taxes to help subsidize the sicker patients.

The bottom line is that at this very moment, 75% of Americans could be saving thousands of dollars per year on their healthcare costs – and have their very own cash-only primary care physician available to them 24-7 by phone, email, home visit, or office visit. The cash-only doc can afford to offer these conveniences because they are paid by the hour to do whatever the patient needs done, without forcing the relationship to conform to insurance billing codes. In fact, the physician saves a bundle on coding and billing fees – and can pass that on to the patients.”

I wondered about the outrageous costs of laboratory fees and radiology charges for people who don’t qualify for the insurance company negotiated rate. Dappen explained:

“My practice has negotiated similar rates with local labs and radiology groups. Screening tests and x-rays are very reasonable.”

I asked Dr. Dappen who uses his services.

“I see both ends of the spectrum. The high-powered executives who don’t have the time to wait in a doctor’s office and enjoy the convenience of handling things with me via phone or house call. For them, time is money, and by losing half a day or more traveling to a doctor’s office and waiting for their 15 minute slot, they might lose $5000 in billable work time. On the other end I see patients with no insurance or high deductible plans. They enjoy the same conveniences, and end up paying an average of $300/year for their healthcare. This is high quality care that they can afford.”

I guess the only thing preventing this model of healthcare from taking off is the courage of individuals to try something new. I myself have switched to a cash-only practice with a high deductible health insurance plan, and have saved myself thousands a year in the process. I love the convenience of knowing that my doctor has all my records in his EMR, I have his cell phone number, and he can renew my prescriptions with a simple email request. I can’t imagine why more people aren’t doing this.

Alan Dappen says, “They just have to wake up out of the Matrix.”

**For more in-depth coverage of the rising trend in cash-only practices, check out MedPage Today’s special report.**


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4 Responses to “Cash-Only Physician Practices Could Save You A Bundle”

  1. Patient says:

    This is great. I've been a patient of Dr. Dappen's for 2.5 years now–I first found him when I was desperate for a housecall doctor and searched the internet for one in Northern Virginia (on a whim–not thinking that any would be out there). He came that same morning, with a nurse, and did what would have cost me $1000 out of pocket at the ER for a fraction of that cost ( and at the ER there would have been hours of waiting, and difficulty in getting there, and I had no real need to be there other than not having insurance at that time).

    Over the years, I've gotten excellent and prompt care, and most importantly (to me), office visits and phone consultations aren't rushed–the time spent with the doctor is patient-driven, and the patient is charged accordingly.

    I now have a high deductible individual plan (in case of serious illness or injury) whose monthly rates are very low, and my appointments tend to run only slightly higher than many people's co-pays for office visits. I still don't know why more people don't do this–you can save money AND get better care.

  2. Patient says:

    This is great. I've been a patient of Dr. Dappen's for 2.5 years now–I first found him when I was desperate for a housecall doctor and searched the internet for one in Northern Virginia (on a whim–not thinking that any would be out there). He came that same morning, with a nurse, and did what would have cost me $1000 out of pocket at the ER for a fraction of that cost ( and at the ER there would have been hours of waiting, and difficulty in getting there, and I had no real need to be there other than not having insurance at that time).

    Over the years, I've gotten excellent and prompt care, and most importantly (to me), office visits and phone consultations aren't rushed–the time spent with the doctor is patient-driven, and the patient is charged accordingly.

    I now have a high deductible individual plan (in case of serious illness or injury) whose monthly rates are very low, and my appointments tend to run only slightly higher than many people's co-pays for office visits. I still don't know why more people don't do this–you can save money AND get better care.

  3. Mehdi Akiki says:

    We need to fight inefficiencies in the system.

    Thanks for opening our eyes.

    Mehdi Akiki

  4. Mehdi Akiki says:

    We need to fight inefficiencies in the system.

    Thanks for opening our eyes.

    Mehdi Akiki

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