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Avoid Surgeons Without Accredited Training: It Could Save Your Life

Three young mothers under the age of 40 are dead because they wanted to be beautiful. Kellee Lee-Howard wanted a slimmer body. Ditto Maria Shortall and Rohie Kah-Orukatan. Shortall worked as a housekeeper; Lee-Howard was the mother of six kids and Kah-Orukotan died at the same place where she received manicures. What do these women have in common besides being minorities? They had liposuction procedures performed by men who offered a discounted price for an elective surgical procedure. These men professed to be competent in performing the procedures but never had accredited training.

I knew this day was coming. I saw the storm long before the clouds emerged. As the insurance payments for professional medical services decreased and declined, physicians began to look for alternative ways to earn money. But was it ethical? Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at Dr. Linda Burke-Galloway*

Why Do Newer Liposuction Techniques Leave The Skin Sagging?

The ladies in this story have had a “new” form of lipo instead of a tummy tuck. Their stomachs do look thinner but their skin in wrinkly. Would they have been better served by having a tummy tuck and then lipo? Is it just their age that has their skin looking that way?


VASER liposuction has been around for a while. I have used it and it is effective. The main question with newer lipo technologies is: “Are they worth the added expense and can they increase problems?”

Many of them (VASER included) make it even easier to take out more and more fat. As we have discussed here before of course more fat removal is not always desirable. Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at Truth in Cosmetic Surgery*

Looking For A Surgeon: Board Certification Is Not The First Thing To Consider

Don’t simply look for a surgeon who is board certified.  Make sure they are trained to do the procedure you are having.  Yes, board certification is important, but the training is more so (in my humble opinion).

If you are having a breast augmentation, you don’t want a board certified maxillofacial surgeon or Ob-Gyn or neurosurgeon.  You want someone trained in plastic surgery.  It is a bonus if they are board certified.  By the same token, if you need brain surgery you don’t want a board certified plastic surgeon you want someone trained in neurosurgery.

This rant was prompted by Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at Suture for a Living*

Cartoon: Unintended Consequences Of Liposuction?

The Most Popular Plastic Surgery Procedures By Age Group

The American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery publishes statistics every year indicating which cosmetic operations are on the rise. A journalist at the OC Register asked a group of plastic surgeons why this might be. Being that I am opinionated (why do you think I blog here,) I figured I’d take a shot at some of these:

I. Statistic: TEENS – Nosejobs and Otoplasty (commonly referred to as “ear pinning”) on the rise

Dr D: Part of the development of the teen psyche involves becoming aware of social norms. As they do this, they also become aware of differences and develop standards of beauty. Many of these teen nose jobs are justified as medically-needed, but appearance usually factors in. Otoplasty is a similarly social operation.

II. Statistic: YOUNG ADULTS – Breast implants. Ages 19-34. 166,000 a year. (ASAPS)

Dr D: “Beauty standards” are important motivators here as well. Young adults in the workplace (and social groups) see those around them doing these things and often being complimented. Some of these patients may also be seeking after childbirth “body repair.”

III. Statistic: EARLY MIDDLE AGE – Liposuction. Ages 35-50. 143,000 a year. (ASAPS)

Dr D: A slowing metabolism in this age group combined with more involved work schedules (with increased sedentary time) equals increased trouble “holding back the fat.” Liposuction is easy and can help with that. Add some post-pregnancy issues here as well.

IV. Statistic: YOUNG ADULTS – Botox. Ages 19-34. 371,000 a year. (ASAPS)

Dr D: The fad of Botox use in the really young is an advertising phenomenon as there is no good reason for young people to do this other than to “feel” hip.

My opinions of course. :)

*This blog post was originally published at Truth in Cosmetic Surgery*

Latest Interviews

IDEA Labs: Medical Students Take The Lead In Healthcare Innovation

It’s no secret that doctors are disappointed with the way that the U.S. healthcare system is evolving. Most feel helpless about improving their work conditions or solving technical problems in patient care. Fortunately one young medical student was undeterred by the mountain of disappointment carried by his senior clinician mentors…

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How To Be A Successful Patient: Young Doctors Offer Some Advice

I am proud to be a part of the American Resident Project an initiative that promotes the writing of medical students residents and new physicians as they explore ideas for transforming American health care delivery. I recently had the opportunity to interview three of the writing fellows about how to…

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Latest Book Reviews

Book Review: Is Empathy Learned By Faking It Till It’s Real?

I m often asked to do book reviews on my blog and I rarely agree to them. This is because it takes me a long time to read a book and then if I don t enjoy it I figure the author would rather me remain silent than publish my…

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The Spirit Of The Place: Samuel Shem’s New Book May Depress You

When I was in medical school I read Samuel Shem s House Of God as a right of passage. At the time I found it to be a cynical yet eerily accurate portrayal of the underbelly of academic medicine. I gained comfort from its gallows humor and it made me…

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Eat To Save Your Life: Another Half-True Diet Book

I am hesitant to review diet books because they are so often a tangled mess of fact and fiction. Teasing out their truth from falsehood is about as exhausting as delousing a long-haired elementary school student. However after being approached by the authors’ PR agency with the promise of a…

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