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Cardiologist Expresses Doubt About Implications Of New Leadless Pacemaker

From Medgadget via The Medical Quack:

EBR Systems, a start-up out of Sunnyvale California, and Cambridge Consultants, the technology design and development firm, have developed a leadless pacemaker system for patients with advanced heart failure. The Wireless Cardiac Stimulation System (WiCS) comprises two units, an implantable electrode and an external control unit. The electrode incorporates an ultrasonic, wireless receiver and delivers an electrical stimulus to the heart based on triggering signals from the external control unit.

In its current iteration the WiCS system is designed to work with conventional pacemakers/defibrillators pacing the right ventricle of patients requiring biventricular pacing. The WiCS external control unit senses the pacing stimulus delivered to the right ventricle and initiates a burst of stimulus from the electrode implanted in the left ventricle. According to the company, Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at Dr. Wes*

Man Dies In An Attempt To Remove His Own Pacemaker

A 47-year-old Chicago man died after trying to remove his own pacemaker. He’s not the first to try self-surgery, as it turns out.

The Chicago Tribune described this most recent attempt at self-surgery:

“Chicago Fire Department paramedics were called after the man told a worker in the home that he was experiencing chest pains and asked them to call an ambulance.

“The man returned to his room, where he remained until paramedics arrived, police said. When they did, he complained to them about chest pains and was taken to the ambulance where he fell unconscious, police said.

“As paramedics were trying to revive him, they discovered Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at ACP Internist*

Cardiac Devices Causing More Infections: What’s The Cause?

A new report published online in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and reported in and elsewhere, suggests the infection rate of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CEID’s) between 1993 and 2008 has greatly increased from 1.53% in 2004 to 2.41% in 2008 (p < 0.001) with a dramatic rise in 2005:

Click image to enlarge

The authors explain this sudden increase on the basis of comorbities: Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at Dr. Wes*

The Difficulties Of Managing Implanted Medical Devices

With the explosion of medical devices to treat various medical ailments in medicine, we have seen significant improvements in quality and quantity of life. An underappreciated consequence of all of these electronic device therapies, however, has been the manpower and expertise required to manage these implanted electronic medical devices long-term.

Problems with electromagnetic interference (EMI) with medical devices are real. Innovations in medicine have come from various portions of the electromagnetic spectrum including analog and digital wireless technology, diagnostic and therapeutic radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging. The effects of these technologies on implanted electronic medical devices can vary and specialty physicians, ancillary health care providers, and medical device manufacturers expend significant man-hours managing these potential interference sources and their affects on devices without a single prospective randomized trial to guide us. The sheer number of devices and the many ways that EMI can interfere with these complex devices makes constructing an all-inclusive trial with sufficient number of “events” to compare difficult or nearly impossible. As a result, most of our management recommendations and hospital policies in this regard have been based from literature case reports or personal experience and expertise.

To date, recommendations for minimizing EMI with cardiac implantable electronic devices has Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at Dr. Wes*

When A Routine Case In The EP Lab Goes Awry

Easy case.

Seen it a hundred times.

Old guy (or gal).

Comes into ER.

Found “down.”

“Hey doc, looks like his hearts goin’ slow. I think he (or she) needs a pacer.”

“On any meds that might do this?”


“How’s his (her) potassium?”

“4.3, normal.”

And like lots of times, you head in. Glad you can help. Call-team’s on their way, thanks to you. Called the device rep to make sure they can be there just in case, too. Cool as a cucumber. Nothin’ to it. Been here, done this.

You arrive to a guy (or gal) that looks pretty good. Maybe has one or two medical problems. Heart rate’s better thanks to the atropine and the fluids they gave him (her) on arrival. The intraosseus line in the tibia is impressive, too. (“At least he (she) wasn’t awake when that happened,” you think.)

So you review, examine, plan your approach. EKG on presentation? Ouch, heart rate agonal. Wide complex rhythm of right bundle branch rhythm. Look at the monitor: “lots more right bundle branch rhythm there, thank goodness, P waves, too.” you secretely notice.

Seems he (or she) is willing (how many times does he (or she) want to pass out at home?), understands what lies ahead, that the crew’s on their way. “We’ll be taking you over in just a few minutes. Any other questions?” There are none.


And after a while the crew arrives, assembles the poor guy (or gal) on the table and ships him (or her) over to the cath lab area. Chest is prepped, equipment assembled, antibiotics given, monitors connected…

… damn we’re good. Smooth operators.

So the local anesthetic is injected and the incisions made. Dissection to the pre-pectoralis fascia just above the breast muscle accomplished, even the wires passed easily into the vein using ultrasound guidance. Even having a nice chat with the guy (or gal).

Poetry in motion.

Sheaths placed in the vein over the guidewire, pacing leads placed through the sheath. Until, from the control room… Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at Dr. Wes*

Latest Interviews

IDEA Labs: Medical Students Take The Lead In Healthcare Innovation

It’s no secret that doctors are disappointed with the way that the U.S. healthcare system is evolving. Most feel helpless about improving their work conditions or solving technical problems in patient care. Fortunately one young medical student was undeterred by the mountain of disappointment carried by his senior clinician mentors…

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How To Be A Successful Patient: Young Doctors Offer Some Advice

I am proud to be a part of the American Resident Project an initiative that promotes the writing of medical students residents and new physicians as they explore ideas for transforming American health care delivery. I recently had the opportunity to interview three of the writing fellows about how to…

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Latest Book Reviews

Book Review: Is Empathy Learned By Faking It Till It’s Real?

I m often asked to do book reviews on my blog and I rarely agree to them. This is because it takes me a long time to read a book and then if I don t enjoy it I figure the author would rather me remain silent than publish my…

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The Spirit Of The Place: Samuel Shem’s New Book May Depress You

When I was in medical school I read Samuel Shem s House Of God as a right of passage. At the time I found it to be a cynical yet eerily accurate portrayal of the underbelly of academic medicine. I gained comfort from its gallows humor and it made me…

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Eat To Save Your Life: Another Half-True Diet Book

I am hesitant to review diet books because they are so often a tangled mess of fact and fiction. Teasing out their truth from falsehood is about as exhausting as delousing a long-haired elementary school student. However after being approached by the authors’ PR agency with the promise of a…

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