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Latest Posts

The Ten Types of Doctor Bloggers

One of my favourite blogs just featured a nice picture that presents the 10 typical types of medical bloggers.

Here they are:

  • Dr. Funny
  • Dr. Mommy
  • Dr. Boring
  • Dr. Didactic
  • Dr. Product Placement
  • Dr. Resident
  • Dr. No Longer A Doctor
  • Dr. Political
  • Dr. Miracle
  • Dr. Whiny

Which type do you belong to?

Click on the image for the original source and size.


*This blog post was originally published at ScienceRoll*

Can We Diagnose Autoimmune Disease Via Gene Expression Analysis?

It’s a pleasure to share the great news that we just published our review in Trends in Molecular Medicine under the title, Gene expression profiles in peripheral blood for the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. We looked at the literature and wrote about whether peripheral blood can be used for the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases or the prediction of the effectiveness of therapies. We also came up with a decision tree and a set of proposed guides in order to facilitate inter-disciplinary collaborations.

The paper is not publicly available, but if you are interested, I’d be happy to send it to you via e-mail.

Gene expression profiling in clinical genomics has yet to deliver robust and reliable approaches for developing diagnostics and contributing to personalized medicine. Owing to technological developments and the recent accumulation of expression profiles, it is a timely and relevant question whether peripheral blood gene expression profiling can be used routinely in clinical decision making. Here, we review the available gene expression profiling data of peripheral blood in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases and suggest that peripheral blood mononuclear cells are suitable for descriptive and comparative gene expression analyses. A gene-disease interaction network in chronic inflammatory diseases, a general protocol for future studies and a decision tree for researchers are presented to facilitate standardization and adoption of this approach.


*This blog post was originally published at ScienceRoll*

A Social Media Guide For Researchers

I’ve recently come across a great guide about using social media in science. I cover this issue in my university course, Internet in Medicine, and I’ll definitely update my materials with these suggestions. From the Research Information Network:

This guide has been produced by the [University of Derby] International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS), and aims to provide the information needed to make an informed decision about using social media and select from the vast range of tools that are available.

One of the most important things that researchers do is to find, use and disseminate information, and social media offers a range of tools which can facilitate this. The guide discusses the use of social media for research and academic purposes and will not be examining the many other uses that social media is put to across society.

*This blog post was originally published at ScienceRoll*

App-Tracking The Flu

As a part of the TheraFlu campaign, Novartis has developed free Android, Blackberry and iPhone applications for tracking flu outbreaks in the U.S. These days it’s become inevitable to develop free apps on all platforms in order to promote your product. From Novartis:

Keep up-to-date on the most active cold and flu reports around the country. The WheresFlu™ app follows sickness incidence levels from week to week and keeps track of the current top 5 affected cities in the nation. The WheresFlu™ app will find your current location and provide you with results for that area. Or you can enter a ZIP code to get information for that area.

If you’re wondering how it actually works and how it differs from Google Flu Trends, here it is:

WheresFlu™ measures weekly activity for cold and flu based upon real-time reports of symptoms from SDI FAN® (a source used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). As the longest-running respiratory tracking program in the US, SDI FAN® covers illness levels in 135 regions across the country utilizing panel-member reporting along with patient-specific data. Advanced tracking uses illness status levels to predict change in the affected population for the nine US Census Regions.

*This blog post was originally published at ScienceRoll*

Teleporting The DNA Of HIV?

Luc Montagnier received the 2008 Nobel Prize for his discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but now he’s come up with a more-than-strange theory. He thinks DNA can teleport from one tube to another via electromagnetic signals. Is this the so-called “Nobel disease?”

French virologist Luc Montagnier stunned his colleagues at a prestigious international conference when he presented a new method for detecting viral infections that bore close parallels to the basic tenets of homeopathy.

Although fellow Nobel prize winners — who view homeopathy as quackery — were left openly shaking their heads, Montagnier’s comments were rapidly embraced by homeopaths eager for greater credibility.

Montagnier told the conference last week that solutions containing the DNA of pathogenic bacteria and viruses, including HIV, “could emit low frequency radio waves” that induced surrounding water molecules to become arranged into “nanostructures.” These water molecules, he said, could also emit radio waves.

He suggested water could retain such properties even after the original solutions were massively diluted, to the point where the original DNA had effectively vanished. In this way, he suggested, water could retain the “memory” of substances with which it had been in contact — and doctors could use the emissions to detect disease.

*This blog post was originally published at ScienceRoll*

Latest Interviews

IDEA Labs: Medical Students Take The Lead In Healthcare Innovation

It’s no secret that doctors are disappointed with the way that the U.S. healthcare system is evolving. Most feel helpless about improving their work conditions or solving technical problems in patient care. Fortunately one young medical student was undeterred by the mountain of disappointment carried by his senior clinician mentors…

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How To Be A Successful Patient: Young Doctors Offer Some Advice

I am proud to be a part of the American Resident Project an initiative that promotes the writing of medical students residents and new physicians as they explore ideas for transforming American health care delivery. I recently had the opportunity to interview three of the writing fellows about how to…

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Latest Book Reviews

Book Review: Is Empathy Learned By Faking It Till It’s Real?

I m often asked to do book reviews on my blog and I rarely agree to them. This is because it takes me a long time to read a book and then if I don t enjoy it I figure the author would rather me remain silent than publish my…

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The Spirit Of The Place: Samuel Shem’s New Book May Depress You

When I was in medical school I read Samuel Shem s House Of God as a right of passage. At the time I found it to be a cynical yet eerily accurate portrayal of the underbelly of academic medicine. I gained comfort from its gallows humor and it made me…

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Eat To Save Your Life: Another Half-True Diet Book

I am hesitant to review diet books because they are so often a tangled mess of fact and fiction. Teasing out their truth from falsehood is about as exhausting as delousing a long-haired elementary school student. However after being approached by the authors’ PR agency with the promise of a…

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