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More germs found on desk tops than toilet seats

Microbiologist Charles Gerba has made a career out of scaring people with news of how dirty seemingly innocent surfaces can be.  Dr. Gerba has taken media on germ tours of kitchens, bathrooms, and offices, and now in his new research study he finds that office desks have 400x more bacterial colonies than toilet seats.  Moreover, he found that women’s desks generally have 4x more bacteria than men’s.  He attributes this to women having more makeup and food products in their desks, as well as having greater contact with small children.

Well, before we all become totally grossed out and paranoid, lets think for a minute about this.  If there are so many bacteria all around us (even on our desks) and we’re generally not sick, then I guess we shouldn’t all rush out to buy bleach and sanitizers.  Other studies suggest that sanitizers disrupt the natural ecosystem around us, creating resistant organisms that are harder to kill.

Personally, I think that precautions should be taken to reduce transmission of viruses and bacterial infections (especially in the hospital environment) but that it is unreasonable, and perhaps even harmful, to wage an indescriminate war on all bacteria everywhere.

If your loved ones are sick, minimize your exposure to their droplets, wash your hands frequently, and sanitize surfaces that they are in direct contact with.  Otherwise, if you’re feeling well, I wouldn’t worry too much about bleaching your desk surface.

As one microbiology lab says,

“Support bacteria.  It’s the only culture some people have.”This post originally appeared on Dr. Val’s blog at RevolutionHealth.com.

Scary virus revived by scientists

In 1918, a man died of a vicious strain of “Spanish Flu” and was buried in the Alaskan tundra. Almost a century later, scientists found his well preserved body poking through some permafrost and decided to take tissue samples to a Canadian laboratory to thaw out the virus that killed the man.

Sounds like the beginning of a made-for-TV, horror movie, doesn’t it? Well, I wish it were fiction. This is a true story.

So why did the scientists revive this infectious menace? To see what it would do to modern day macaque monkeys, of course.

The BBC news reports:

“Symptoms appeared within 24 hours of exposure to the virus, and the subsequent destruction of lung tissue was so widespread that, had the monkeys not been put to sleep a few days later, they would literally have drowned in their own blood.”

Um… gross?

The scientists say,

“This research provides an important piece in the puzzle of the 1918 virus, helping us to better understand influenza viruses and their potential to cause pandemics.”

The BBC continues:

“Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-M) revealed that a key component of the immune system, a gene called RIG-1 appeared to be involved.

Levels of the protein produced by the gene were lower in tissue infected with the 1918 virus, suggesting it had a method of switching it off, causing immune defenses to run wild. This ability to alter the body’s immune response is shared with the most recent candidate for mutation into a pandemic strain, the H5N1 avian flu.”

There is a final word from Dr. Jim Robertson, a British virologist:

“Many influenza virologists remain nervous about creating and experimenting with a reconstructed 1918 Spanish flu virus.”

Yeah, I’m nervous too.

This post originally appeared on Dr. Val’s blog at RevolutionHealth.com.

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