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Latest Posts

Nurse Prompts Are Key To Successful Implementation Of ICU Safety Measures

Over the last few years, you may have heard a lot about the value of checklists in ICU medicine and their ability to reduce mortality, reduce cost and reduce length of stay.   But a recent study took the concept one step further and suggested that checklists by themselves may not be  effective unless physicians are prompted to act on the checklist.

As reported in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Journal, a single site cohort study performed at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine’s medical intensive care unit compared two rounding groups of physicians.  One group was prompted to use the checklist.  The other group of physicians had access to the checklist but were not prompted to use it.

What they found was shocking.  Both groups had access to the checklist.  However, patients followed by physicians who were prompted to use the checklist had Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at The Happy Hospitalist*

Do Physicians Prefer Ventilated And Sedated Patients?

You ever wonder what doctors really think but are afraid to say out loud?  Here’s one example:

“I wish all my patients were on a ventilator”

There’s a reason vented and sedated patients are considered desirable.  In addition to the obvious economic benefits of

There are the less talked about, but equally pleasant side effects most hospitalists, ER doctors, cardiologists, gastroenterologists, pulmonologists,  surgeons, infectious disease doctors, endocrinologists, psychiatrists, rheumatologists, dermatologists, nurses, respiratory therapists and physical therapists wouldn’t admit, but would agree, without hesitation.  As a general rule:

  • Patients on ventilators are just faster, easier and more pleasant to take care of. Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at The Happy Hospitalist*

Medical Apps Allow Doctors To Monitor ICU Patients Remotely

We have reported in the past on AirStrip, a smartphone and iPad app that allows a mobile doctor to monitor the vital signs of patients in an obstetric ward or an ICU. The reverse, where a fixed doctor monitors multiple remote patients is now entering the mainstream and already making a difference in many patients’ lives.

In a compelling anecdote recently reported in Computerworld, a man experienced cardiac arrest while shopping and was taken to a nearby community hospital. An intensivist, monitoring from an eICU miles away, was immediately consulted. The remote doctor guided the treating physicians as they initiated unfamiliar hypothermia therapy to preserve the brain, and continued to follow the patient remotely throughout his 10 day ICU stay.  Happily, the patient had a good outcome and is quoted in the article as an enthusiastic proponent of eICUs. Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at iMedicalApps*

Bad Behavior In South Africa – A Gory Story

South African society is a completely lawless society. Pretty much everyone does just what they like and more often than not they get away with it. Red lights are just a suggestion, yet it is not uncommon to see a taxi stop in the middle of the road without warning. This attitude goes through almost all levels.

Yet there are some laws that people do obey. The law of gravity comes to mind. Mostly if you trip or fall off a wall or out a window you do approach the earth with increasing velocity and finally come to rest in some form of disrepair when you finally meet said earth, even if you are South African.  Another law that is obeyed was well illustrated by a patient we once saw in the old days. Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at other things amanzi*

Tough Love: When Should Physicians Use This Strategy?

Have you ever stopped bothering to care about a patient?  A doctor sent me his own personal account of the smoking Mr Jones:

Dear Happy.  I read your article on bounce backs with great interest, and was astonished by some of the vitriol it elicited.  I remember having one COPDer bounce back to me three times within a month at the VA when I was a medicine resident.  He would leave, smoke and drink, and then come back and be readmitted to my service with exactly the same course each time.  It was like Groundhog Day.

Finally I had a little talk with him and said: “Mr. Jones, each time you come in, you’re on death’s door.  So I come down to the ER, stay up with you all night and save your life.  But you know, I’m really getting tired of having you come in after drinking and smoking and then working like a dog to save your life.  So let me tell you, if you don’t quit smoking, the next time you do this there’s a good chance that I’m not going to bother.  Why should I?  It doesn’t seem to be doing either of us any good.”

To my complete astonishment, he actually quit smoking and stayed quit for about a year.  Then he fell off the wagon, deteriorated too far before getting to the hospital and died.  I was frankly proud of him for the effort, but somehow suspect that I’d be shot in a drive-by if I ever told that story in public. Read more »

*This blog post was originally published at The Happy Hospitalist Blog*

Latest Interviews

IDEA Labs: Medical Students Take The Lead In Healthcare Innovation

It’s no secret that doctors are disappointed with the way that the U.S. healthcare system is evolving. Most feel helpless about improving their work conditions or solving technical problems in patient care. Fortunately one young medical student was undeterred by the mountain of disappointment carried by his senior clinician mentors…

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How To Be A Successful Patient: Young Doctors Offer Some Advice

I am proud to be a part of the American Resident Project an initiative that promotes the writing of medical students residents and new physicians as they explore ideas for transforming American health care delivery. I recently had the opportunity to interview three of the writing fellows about how to…

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Latest Book Reviews

Book Review: Is Empathy Learned By Faking It Till It’s Real?

I m often asked to do book reviews on my blog and I rarely agree to them. This is because it takes me a long time to read a book and then if I don t enjoy it I figure the author would rather me remain silent than publish my…

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The Spirit Of The Place: Samuel Shem’s New Book May Depress You

When I was in medical school I read Samuel Shem s House Of God as a right of passage. At the time I found it to be a cynical yet eerily accurate portrayal of the underbelly of academic medicine. I gained comfort from its gallows humor and it made me…

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Eat To Save Your Life: Another Half-True Diet Book

I am hesitant to review diet books because they are so often a tangled mess of fact and fiction. Teasing out their truth from falsehood is about as exhausting as delousing a long-haired elementary school student. However after being approached by the authors’ PR agency with the promise of a…

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